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HIMARS M142

High-Mobility Rocket Artillery System

The M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is a light multiple rocket launcher. The M142 HIMARS is a lightweight, air-transportable, wheeled variant of the M270 MLRS tracked vehicle rocket launching system based on the MTV chassis. It will fire any rocket or missile in the MLRS family of munitions (MFOM). The HIMARS fires either six MLRS rockets or one Army Tactical Missile. The HIMARS launchers have some commonality with their older and heavier tracked cousins, the M270 and M270A1 launcher systems. The HIMARS design concept includes the familiar launcher module, fire control, and digital command and control systems and a self-reload capability. The HIMARS uses the same command, control and communications, as well as the same crew as the MLRS launcher, but carries only one rocket or missile pod. It can roll on and off a C–130 transport aircraft and, when carried with a combat load, is ready to operate within 15 minutes of landing. Because of the reduced weight of using one pod rather than two, it has a faster time, compared to the M270, from the point the fire mission is received to the actual munition firing. Lockheed Martin developed HIMARS beginning in 1996. HIMARS Is mounted on a Medium Tactical Truck (MTV) 5-Ton 6X6 M1140 truck frame. 540 Units were produced before production was stopped in 2020. After the world saw the success of HIMARS deployment in Ukraine in 2022, Poland and Estonia placed orders for more than 500 HIMARS Units.

HIMARS Mission
Close-Range and Long-Range precision rocket and missile fire support for Army and Marine early-entry expeditionary forces, contingency forces, and Modular Fires Brigades supporting Brigade Combat Teams
Principal LIN (PLIN)
E095AA
M142 HIMARS High Mobility Artillery Rocket System
US Marines Corps Test Firing M142 HIMARS

HIMARS M142 Technical Manuals

TM-9-2320-450-10
OPERATOR MANUAL
M142 HIMARS
TM-9-2320-450-10-HR
HAND RECEIPT
M142 HIMARS
TM-9-2320-450-20-1
UNIT MAINTENANCE Volume 1
M142 HIMARS
TM-9-2320-450-20-2
UNIT MAINTENANCE Volume 2
M142 HIMARS
TM-9-2320-450-24P
PARTS MANUAL
M142 HIMARS
TM-9-2320-450-34
DIRECT SUPPORT MAINTENANCE
M142 HIMARS
TM-9-2320-450-PMC
DAILY PMCS
M142 HIMARS
TM-55-2320-450-14
TRANSPORT GUIDANCE M142 HIMARS
TM-10937B-OR/1-2
OPERATOR MANUAL M142 HIMARS
MRS Veh S/N 115332 and Below
NSN 2320-01-491-3436
CPH Veh S/N 115333 and Above
NSN 2320-01-565-3428
TM-9-2320-450-13&P
OPERATOR & FIELD MAINTENANCE MANUAL M142 HIMARS LAUNCHER CHASSIS
CPH Veh S/N 115333 and Above
NSN 2320-01-565-3428
MRS Veh S/N 11532 and Below
NSN 2320-01-491-3436

HIMARS M142 Technical Bulletins

TB-9-2320-450-40&P
CREW CAB REAR CATCH MODIFICATION

HIMARS M142 Lubrication Orders

LO-9-2320-450-12
LUBRICATION ORDER
M142 HIMARS

HIMARS M142 IETM (Interactive Electronic TM)

TM 9-1055-1646-13&P
DIRECT & GENERAL SUPPORT MAINTENANCE MANUAL
WITH PARTS (IETM) - HIMARS
TM 9-2300-310-14&P
DIRECT & GENERAL SUPPORT MAINTENANCE MANUAL
WITH PARTS (IETM) - HIMARS Launcher Chassis

HIMARS M142 Training Guides

STP-9-MOS-94P1-SM-TG
MOS-94P1 HIMARS REPAIRER
Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS)

HIMARS M142 Technical Documents

ADP-3-19
ADP-3-19 FIRES
ADP-3-37
ADP-3-37 Protection
AR-710-1
AR-710-1 Inventory Management
ATP-3-09-02
ATP-3-09-02 Field Artillery Survey
ATP-3-09-12
ATP-3-09-12 Field Artillery Counterfire and
Weapons Locating Radar Operations
ATP-3-09-24
ATP-3-09-24 The Field Artillery Brigade
ATP-3-09-30
ATP 3-09-30 Observed Fires
ATP-3-09-42
ATP-3-09-42 Fire Support - Brigade Combat Team
ATP-3-09-90
ATP-3-09-90 Division Artillery Operations
ATP-3-91-1
ATP-3-91-1 Joint Air Ground Integration
ATP-3-94-2
ATP-3-94-2 Deep Operations
ATP-4-90
ATP-4-90 Brigade Support Battalion
ATP-5-0-2-1
ATP 5-0-2-1 Staff Reference Guide
FM-3-09
FM-3-09 Fire Support and
Field Artillery Operations
FM-3-81
FM-3-81 Maneuver Enhancement Brigade
P-385-63
P-385-63 Range Safety
P-600-25
P-600-25 US Army Noncommissioned Officer
Professional Development Guide
TC-3-09-8
TC-3-09-8 Fire Support and Field Artillery
Certification and Qualification

HIMARS M142 Technical Specifications

Crew
Driver
Gunner
Launcher Chief
Dimensions
Length: 23 ft (7 m)
Width: 7 ft 10 in (2.4 m)
Height: 10 ft 6 in (3.2 m)
35,800 lb (16,250 kg)
Mobility
Engine: Caterpillar 3136 330 hp (250 kW)
Transmission: 7-Speed Automatic
Suspension: Beam Axles on Leaf Springs
Maximum Speed: 53 mph (85 km/h)
Operational Range: 300 miles (480 km)

MLRS M270 / HIMARS M142 Projectiles

GMLRS
M30 Rocket
M30A1 Rocket
M30A2 Rocket
M31 Rocket
M31A1 Rocket
M31A2 Rocket
ER GMLRS Rocket
ATACMS
M39 Rocket
M39A1 Rocket
M48 Rocket
M57 Rocket
M57E1 Rocket
PrSM

HIMARS Supplies

Dry-Lubricant (Ball-Screw Actuators)
MS-122AD NSN 9150-01-528-5624
HIMARS Batteries
4 x MS52149-2 6TL
NSN 6140-01-548-0923
HIMARS Batteries - Maintenance Free
4 x 12472287 6TMF
NSN 6140-01-598-1400
HIMARS Starter Motor
M0017703MD with Thermal Protection
NSN 2920-01-364-1598
M0017703ME without Thermal Protection
NSN 2920-01-460-4019
MTV (HIMARS) Oil Filter
1R0739 NSN 2940-01-513-1518
MTV (HIMARS) Intake Air Filter
P52-7750 NSN 2940-01-361-2407
MTV (HIMARS) Fuel Filter
7E9763 NSN 2910-01-363-3089

Biography of the M142 HIMARS

The M142 carries one pod with either six GMLRS rockets, or two PrSM missiles, or one ATACMS missile on the US Army's Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) five-ton truck and can launch the entire Multiple Launch Rocket System Family of Munitions (MFOM). M142 ammunition pods are interchangeable with the M270 MLRS; however, it is only able to carry one pod rather than the standard two for the M270 and its variants. The launcher can be transported by Lockheed C-130 Hercules aircraft. The chassis was initially produced by BAE Systems Mobility & Protection Systems (formerly Armor Holdings Aerospace and Defense Group Tactical Vehicle Systems Division), the original equipment manufacturer of the FMTV. It was produced by Oshkosh from 2010 to 2017. Both chassis and launcher system are now produced by Lockheed Martin Missiles & Fire Control.

The M147 HIMARS is re-supplied in the field by a dedicated vehicle type, the MTVR MK37 HIMARS Resupply Vehicle manufactured by Oshkosh. The MTVR (Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement) MK37 is a 6X6 all-terrain cargo truck with Load Handling Equipment (LHE) to load and unload the HIMARS Pods. The MK47 has a permanent trailer to enable its capacity to be two HIMARS Pods.

In June 2022, after the USA HIMARS Production had been ceased for a few years, Poland announced that it would acquire 500 M142 HIMARS Units for its Army Modernization.

The M142 HIMARS was one of the US Military Assets sent to Ukraine in Aid of their war with Russia. On May 31, 2022, the White House informed the press that the US would be supplying M142 launchers to Ukraine with M31 GMLRS unitary rockets. On 1 June, 2022, it was reported that four units will be sent for training purposes. Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Colin Kahl stated that the US would be able to send more systems as the fighting evolves. On June 23, 2022, the first HIMARS arrived in Ukraine according to Ukraine's Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov. On June 25, 2022, Ukraine started deploying the system according to Ukraine's General Staff, Valeriy Zaluzhnyi: "Artillerymen of the Armed Forces of Ukraine skilfully hit certain targets – military targets of the enemy on our, Ukrainian, territory".

MLRS M270 / HIMARS M142 Projectiles

M26 / M26A2 MLRS Rocket

M26 Rocket - Multiple Launch Rocket System HIMARS MLRS

The 227mm M26 basic unguided high-explosive (HE) submunition carrier, tube-launched, unguided, folding fin and spin stabilised, surface-to-surface rocket fired from the armoured, self-propelled, M270 MLRS and M142 HIMARS.

The tactical rocket incorporates a submunition delivery warhead containing 644 x M77 submunitions.

The M26 tactical rockets incorporate an M445 electronic time (ET) fuze that is remotely set and is sustained acceleration armed and ram air powered.

The rocket pod/container, a shipping and storage container (pod) for six rockets, also serves as an expendable launch platform.

The tactical rocket is used against armored and personnel targets and supplements conventional artillery.

Each rocket weighs approximately 677 pounds (307 kilograms) at launch with the approximate expended weight is 463 pounds (210 kilograms).

A fully loaded rocket pod/container weighs 5,236 pounds (2,375 kilograms).

The M26A2 Extended Range Rocket (ER-MLRS) was hastily configured when manufacturing of the M26A1 was delayed. The M26A2 increased range to over 45km and used 518 x M77 bomblets as munition.

M77 Sub-Munition

The M77 sub-munition is a high-explosive dual-purpose improved conventional munition (DPICM), armour-defeating, anti-personnel, submunition containing a shaped-charge and incorporating an impact-inertia fuze for use in rocket delivery systems.

M77 DPICM Bomblet Grenade

While in flight they are stabilised and orientated for impact by the deployment of a nylon ribbon streamer which also creates spin to arm the submunition.

The M77 is designed to function on impact using a simple inertia impact fuzing mechanism.

The submunition body is internally embossed in a diamond pattern to ensure the break up into optimum sized fragments.

When unexploded submunitions are found lying on their sides, the copper cone charge liner is often visible.

The overall body colour is normally black and may sometimes be found with a white band.

When the M42 (with a yellow band for projectiles) is used in a MLRS (rocket) warhead the submunition is designated the M77 (white band for rockets) and has a plastic slider cap over the fuze body before dispersal.

M26A1 MLRS Rocket

M26 Rocket - Multiple Launch Rocket System HIMARS MLRS

The 227mm M26A1 rocket is an extended range MLRS Rocket (ER-MLRS), a derivative of the M26 basic rocket with its range improved from 32km to 45km and the use of the M85 submunition.

The tactical rocket incorporates a submunition delivery warhead containing 518 x M85 grenade submunitions.

The M26A1 tactical rockets share most of the same physical characteristics as the M26.

The M26A1 rocket was delayed in production due to the delayed availablity of the M85 submunitions, so M26A2 rockets were intially produced in its place.

M85 Sub-Munition

The M85 sub-munition is a high-explosive dual-purpose improved conventional munition (DPICM), armour-defeating, anti-personnel, submunition containing a shaped-charge and incorporating an impact-inertia fuze for use in rocket delivery systems.

M85 DPICM Bomblet Grenade

The M85 is similar to the M77 except that unlike the M77 which had a dud rate of about 5%, the M85 improved the failure rate to less than 1% by incorporation of a self-destructing fuze.

The body design gives more effective fragmentation, whilst the shaped charge cone and reduced spin rate produce greater penetration and the dual-action fuze gives greater reliability.

The hollow charge is capable of piercing more than 110mm of armour plate.

The body is constructed from hardened steel fragmentation rings, grooved axially on the inside surface to provide optimum fragmentation.

The use of hardened steel as a material improves the submunitions' ability to withstand setback and removes the need for differing submunitions in the projectile.

The 13 fragmentation rings are pressed together between a base and a stand-off ring.

M28 / M28A1 / M28A2 Practice Rocket

M28A1 Practice Rocket - Multiple Launch Rocket System HIMARS MLRS

The 227mm M28 Practice Rocket is a derivative of the M26 Rocket with steel shot as ballast replacing the munitions.

The tactical rocket incorporates an inert warhead.

The rocket pod/container, a shipping and storage container (pod) for six rockets, also serves as an expendable launch platform.

The practice rocket simulates use of the M26 Tactical Rocket for training.

Each rocket weighs approximately 677 pounds (307 kilograms) at launch with the approximate expended weight is 463 pounds (210 kilograms).

A fully loaded rocket pod/container weighs 5,236 pounds (2,375 kilograms).

The M28A1 Reduced Range Practice Rocket (RRPR) is a M26A1 Rocket with an inert Steel Shot Munitions replacement and a blunted nose to limit range. The high drag nose reduces it maximum range from 45km to 15km. The M28A1 is now obsolete.

The M28A2 Practice Rocket is an improved version of the M28A1 with the same performance but reduced cost.

HIMARS News

LATVIA – M142 HIGH MOBILITY ARTILLERY ROCKET SYSTEM (HIMARS) - July 26th 2022

Latvia has sent a letter of request to buy an undisclosed number of High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems from the United States, with the potential acquisition to be carried out as a joint initiative of the three Baltic states, which also include neighboring Estonia and Lithuania.

“The MoD has sent a letter of request to the U.S. about the availability and prices of HIMARS,” a spokesperson for the Latvian Ministry of Defence told Defense News. “This is a joint project of the Baltic States, and the MoD expects the U.S. to support it with co-financing.”

ESTONIA – M142 HIGH MOBILITY ARTILLERY ROCKET SYSTEM (HIMARS) - July 15th 2022

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Estonia of M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) and related equipment for an estimated cost of up to $500 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale.

The Government of Estonia has requested to purchase up to six (6) M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) Launchers; up to thirty-six (36) M30A2 Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) Alternative Warhead (AW) Missile Pods with Insensitive Munitions Propulsion System (IMPS) and Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave – Directional Doppler Ranging (FMCW-DDR) Proximity Height-of-Burst (HOB) Sensor Capability; up to thirty-six (36) M31A2 GMLRS Unitary High Explosive (HE) Missile Pods with IMPS and FMCW-DDR Proximity HOB Sensor Capability; up to thirty-six (36) XM403 Extended Range GMLRS (ER GMLRS) Alternative Warhead (AW) Missile Pods with IMPS and Side Mounted Proximity Sensor (SMPS) HOB Capability; up to thirty-six (36) XM404 Extended Range GMLRS (ER GMLRS) Unitary Pods with IMPS and SMPS HOB Capability; and up to eighteen (18) M57 Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS) Missile Pods. Also included are M28A2 Low Cost Reduced Range Practice Rocket (LCRRPR) pods; ruggedized laptops; training equipment; publications for HIMARS and munitions/missiles; and other related elements of program and logistic support. The total estimated cost is $500 million.

POLAND – M142 HIGH MOBILITY ARTILLERY ROCKET SYSTEM (HIMARS) - June 7th 2022

Polish Defense Minister Mariusz Błaszczak has announced that the country will acquire 500 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) to support its military modernization efforts.

Błaszczak openly acknowledged that the surge in spending in Poland was triggered by the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

“We also draw conclusions from the war in Ukraine. Its observation confirmed us in the belief that the Polish army must be able to deter enemies based on its own defensive potential and independent defense of our country,” he explained.

AUSTRALIA – HIMARS LAUNCHERS - May 26th 2022

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Australia of HIMARS Launchers and related equipment for an estimated cost of $385 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale.

The Government of Australia has requested to buy twenty (20) M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS); thirty (30) M30A2 Guided Multiple Launch Rocket Systems (GMLRS); thirty (30) Alternative Warhead (AW) Pods with Insensitive Munitions Propulsion Systems (IMPS); thirty (30) M31A2 GMLRS Unitary (GMLRS-U) High Explosive Pods with IMPS; thirty (30) XM403 Extended Range (ER)-GMLRS AW Pods; thirty (30) EM404 ER GMLRS Unitary Pods; and ten (10) M57 Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS). Also included are Reduced Range Practice Rocket Pods (RRPRP); Vehicular Intercom System (AN/VIC-3) 3-Station; radio communication mounts; machine gun mounts; battle management system vehicle integration kits; wheel guards; ruggedized laptops; training equipment publications; spare and repair parts; support equipment; tools; test equipment; technical data; U.S. Government and Contractor support; technical and logistical support services; and other related elements of program and logistic support. The total estimated program cost is $385 million.

TAIWAN - HIMARS, SUPPORT, AND EQUIPMENT - October 21st 2020

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States (TECRO) of eleven (11) High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) M142 Launchers and related equipment for an estimated cost of $436.1 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale.

Taiwan has requested to buy eleven (11) High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) M142 Launchers; sixty-four (64) Army Tactical Missile Systems (ATACMS) M57 Unitary Missiles; seven (7) M1152Al High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs); eleven (11) M240B Machine Guns, 7.62MM; and seventeen (17) International Field Artillery Tactical Data Systems (IFATDS). Also included are fifty-four (54) M28A2 Low Cost Reduced Range Practice Rocket Pods (LCRRPR); eleven (11) M2Al machine guns, .50 caliber; twenty-two (22) AN/NRC-92E dual radio systems; seven (7) AN/NRC-92E dual radio ground stations; fifteen (15) AN/VRC-90E single radio systems; eleven (11) M1084A2 cargo Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) Resupply Vehicles (RSV); two (2) M1089A2 cargo wrecker FMTV RSV; eleven (11) M1095 trailer cargo FMTV, 5-ton; support equipment; communications equipment; spare and repair parts; test sets; laptop computers; training and training equipment; publication; systems integration support; technical data; Stockpile Reliability Program (SRP): Quality Assurance and Technical Assistance Teams; U.S. Government and contractor technical, engineering, and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistical and program support. The total estimated program cost is $436.1 million.

POLAND – HIGH MOBILITY ARTILLERY ROCKET SYSTEM (HIMARS) AND RELATED SUPPORT AND EQUIPMENT - November 29th 2018

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Poland of (20) High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) M142 Launchers, and other related equipment for an estimated cost of $655 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale.

Poland has requested to buy twenty (20) High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) M142 Launchers, thirty-six (36) Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) M31 Unitary, nine (9) Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) M30A1 Alternative Warheads, thirty (30) Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS) M57 Unitary, twenty-four (24) Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data Systems (AFATDS), twenty (20) Multiple Launcher Pod Assembly M68A2 Trainers, twenty-four (24) M1151A1 High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs), and nine (9) M1151A1 High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheel Vehicles (HMMWVs). Also included are twenty (20) Low Cost Reduced Range (LCRR) practice rockets, support equipment, communications equipment, spare and repair parts, test sets, batteries, laptop computers, publications and technical data, facility design, personnel training and equipment, systems integration support, Quality Assurance Teams and a Technical Assistance Fielding Team, United States Government and contractor engineering and logistics personnel services, and other related elements of logistics support, training, sensors, and other related elements of logistics and program support. The estimated cost is $655 million.

POLAND – HIGH MOBILITY ARTILLERY ROCKET SYSTEM (HIMARS) - November 28th 2017

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Poland for a High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) for an estimated cost of $250 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale.

The Government of Poland has requested to purchase sixteen (16) Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) M31A1 Unitary, nine (9) Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) M30A1 alternative warheads, sixty-one (61) Army Tactical Missile Systems (ATACMS) M57 Unitary. Also included are eight (8) Universal Position Navigation Units (UPNU), thirty-four (34) Low Cost Reduced Range (LCRR) practice rockets, one thousand six hundred forty-two (1,642) Guidance and Control Section Assemblies for GMLRS, Missile Common Test Sets and Devices, testing Precision, Lightweight GPS Receivers (PLGR), support equipment, U.S. Government and contractor services, training, and other related elements of logistics and program support. The estimated cost is $250 million.

ROMANIA – M142 HIGH MOBILITY ARTILLERY ROCKET SYSTEM (HIMARS) - August 18th 2017

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Romania for High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) and related support and equipment. The estimated cost is $1.25 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale.

The Government of Romania has requested the possible sale of fifty-four (54) High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) Launchers, eighty-one (81) Guided Multiple Launch Rocket Systems (GMLRS) M31A1 Unitary, eighty-one (81) Guided Multiple Launch Rocket Systems (GMLRS) M30A1 Alternative Warhead, fifty-four (54) Army Tactical Missile Systems (ATACMS) M57 Unitary, twenty-four (24) Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data Systems (AFATDS), fifteen (15) M1151A1 HMMWVs, Utility, Armored, and fifteen (15) M1151A1 HMMWVs, Armor Ready 2-Man. Also included with this request are: fifty-four (54) M1084A1P2 HIMARS Resupply Vehicles (RSVs) (5 ton, Medium Tactical Cargo Vehicle with Material Handling Equipment), fifty-four (54) M1095 MTV Cargo Trailer with RSV kit, and ten (10) M1089A1P2 FMTV Wreckers (5 Ton Medium Tactical Vehicle Wrecker with Winch), thirty (30) Low Cost Reduced Range (LCRR) practice rockets, support equipment, communications equipment, sensors, spare and repair parts, test sets, batteries, laptop computers, publications and technical data, facility design, training and training equipment, systems integration support, Quality Assurance Teams and a Technical Assistance Fielding Team, U.S. Government and contractor technical, engineering, and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics and program support. The total estimated program cost is $1.25 billion.

QATAR – HIMARS, ATACMS, AND GMLRS - December 21st 2012

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress of a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Qatar for rocket and missile systems and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $406 million.

The Government of Qatar has requested a possible sale of 7 M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) Launchers with the Universal Fire Control System (UFCS); 60 M57 Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS) Block 1A T2K Unitary Rockets (60 pods, 1 rocket per pod); 360 M31A1 Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) Unitary Rockets (60 pods, 6 rockets per pod); 180 M28A2 Reduced Range Practice Rockets (30 pods, 6 rockets per pod); 7 M68A2 Trainers, 1 Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS); 2 M1151A1 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV); and 2 M1152A2 HMMWVs. Also included are simulators, generators, transportation, wheeled vehicles, communications equipment, spare and repair parts, s upport equipment, tools and test equipment, technical data and publications, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics support. The estimated cost is $406 million.

JORDAN – HIMARS, GMLRS, AFATDS, SINCGARS - September 9th 2009

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) notified Congress of a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. The sale could include 12 M142 High-Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) Launchers; 72 M31 Unitary Guided Multiple Launch Rocket Systems (GMLRS) Rocket Pods; 36 Multiple Launcher Rocket Systems (MLRS) Practice Rocket Pods; 12 M1084A1P2 Family of Medium Tactical Vehicle Trucks (FMTV); one Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS); three M108A1P2 Wreckers; three M1151A1 High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs); 27 AN/VRC-92E Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio Systems (SINCGARS); and 18 AN/VRC-90E SINCGARS and related services and support. The estimated cost is $220 million.

Also included are support equipment, communications equipment, spare and repair parts, test sets, batteries, laptop computers, publications and technical data, facility design, personnel training and equipment, systems integration support, U.S. Government and contractor engineering and logistics personnel services, and other related elements of logistics support.

HIMARS M142 Family Variants

HIMARS M142 FMTV MTV High Mobility Artillery Rocket System

M142 - High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS)
Medium Tactical Vehicle (MTV)
NSN 1055-01-473-4350

The M142 HIMARS is a lightweight, air-transportable, wheeled variant of the M270 MLRS tracked vehicle rocket launching system based on the MTV chassis. It will fire any rocket or missile in the MLRS family of munitions [MFOM]. The HIMARS fires either six MLRS rockets or one Army Tactical Missile. The HIMARS launchers have some commonality with its older and heavier tracked cousins, the M270 and M270A1 launcher systems. The HIMARS design concept includes the familiar launcher module, fire control, and digital command and control systems, and a self-reload capability. The HIMARS uses the same command, control, and communications, as well as the same crew, as the MLRS launcher but carries only one rocket or missile pod. It can roll on and off a C–130 transport aircraft and, when carried with a combat load, is ready to operate within 15 minutes of landing. Because of the lighter weight of using one pod rather than two, it has a faster time, compared to the M270, from the point the fire mission is received to the actual munition firing.